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Own It

Just as it’s important to not expect perfection of ourselves or other people, it’s also essential that we own our shortcomings. In the past several years I have been baffled by how a significant number of leaders whom I have observed have not acknowledged missteps. To take responsibility for malfunction is a sign of strength and not weakness. Discussion of deficiency with followers or subordinates is the setting of a good example by a leader. In the same way, addressing of incidents of breakdown shouldn’t include over-apologizing. It can include such statements as “I didn’t explain that as best as I could have”, “It wasn’t fair of me to expect that of you”, “I forgot”, “I dropped the ball” and so forth. It is healthy for leaders and followers alike to own shortcomings.

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